Inside Homes: Georgetown Landmark

Deborah and ’s renovation of David and ’s former residence pays homage to the past while providing easy living space for a modern family.

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Dominated by an ornately framed portrait of Czar Alexander II and featuring a velvet folding screen once owned by the late Katharine Graham, this former ballroom is now a perfect space for contemporary entertaining.

Dominated by an ornately framed portrait of Czar Alexander II and featuring a velvet folding screen once owned by the late , this former ballroom is now a perfect space for contemporary entertaining.

There is bound to be tension between competing interests in historic preservation and the needs of modern life when one lives in a home that dates from the early 19th century. Proper balance must reflect both individual preferences and the structure’s importance to a community’s history.

Georgetown’s “Ambassador Bruce House” is a treasure that any city would want to protect from assault by a construction crew. It is one of the grandest and oldest private residences in the capital and one with a storied past filled with Washington intrigue and culture. How fortunate that care of this landmark has fallen to Washingtonians Curtin and , who have resuscitated the grandeur of the past while adding their own unique sense of style.

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