Power Source: Sergeant William Stacey

In memoriam of an American hero and the ideals his legacy embodies.
By

"If my life buys the safety of a child who will one day change the world, then I know that it was all worth it." (Photo Courtesy of Military Times)

“There will be a child who will live because men left the security of their home country to come to his. And this child will learn in new schools that have been built, and he will walk his streets not worried about whether or not his leader’s henchmen will come and kidnap him. And he will grow into a fine man who will pursue every opportunity his heart could desire, and he will have the gift of freedom, which I have enjoyed for so long. If my life buys the safety of a child who will one day change the world, then I know that it was all worth it.” Sergeant (1988-2012)

The wars and armed conflicts that followed the terrorist attacks of 9/11 have costs trillions of dollars and tens of thousands of lives. While civilian leaders have made high-level decisions, read documents, and given speeches about these wars, it is men like Seattle native Sergeant William Stacey who pay the ultimate price – their lives. Large populations of the world live under barbaric, and exploitative conditions that are governed only by the natural law of only the strongest survive. In most of these areas there are no such things as “human rights,” “justice” or “human dignity.” America fights and pays a high cost so that others may be freed from this bondage, as Sergeant Stacey described in his last words.

Millions of Americans protest and disagree with American armed conflict, and it is vital to remember that this very protest is itself a freedom, and would never be allowed in pre-war Iraq, Egypt, Afghanistan, or Libya. The brutal dictatorships that America has helped defeat would murder entire families of individuals who dared to express themselves, and tens of millions of people around the world envy the right to express individual opinion.

The Kony 2012 movement has brought awareness to millions about the brutality commonplace in the world, and we all must support those who are willing to sacrifice for the greater good of humanity. Sergeant Stacey wrote the letter above expressing his thoughts because he knew he might die in the line of duty, and he wanted the world to know why he would rest at peace. Although he was buried two weeks ago in Arlington Cemetery, we all know that he was comfortable with his sacrifice, confident that his death enabled children across Afghanistan to live a better life. The region is home to dozens of military-related institutions, and Power Source salutes the primary aim of these individuals who embody the spirit of Sergeant William Stacey.

Sergeant William Stacey (1988-2012) (Photo Courtesy of Military Times)

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