Hollywood on the Potomac: Wonder Woman

‘Wonder Woman’ hits theaters and a familiar face couldn’t be more pleased.

(Photo by Joy Asico)

This room understands that it’s not just a feel good movie. This is a movie that not only has a great message, but it’s made a lot of money and money talks,” said hostess , executive vice president of Time Warner, before the private screening of Warner Bros. Pictures’ “Wonder Woman” at the Motion Picture Association of America.Addressing the all female Washington contingent who turned out to celebrate Lynda Carter, the original “Wonder Woman” who played the superhero on television from 1975 to 1979, Melton called them “a group of bad- ass, beautiful, smart, yet vulnerable women.” We had a chance to catch up with the starlet who is due to receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame next year.

Since we live in a rewind and reboot society, we asked Carter how she felt about her character evolving to the big screen.“It’s fantastic,” she replied, going on to describe the film as filled with “depth and heart.” “Wonder Woman” was released earlier this year starring breakout actress Gal Gadot. In just a few months it has raked in millions at the box office. Behind the movie’s great success is director Patty Jenkins, whom Carter believes nailed the balance between action and character development scenes. “I knew she understood who this character was and that’s really the essence of any good movie” Carter said.“A lot of slam-bam doesn’t really hold anybody’s interest anymore.You have to have a story.”

Carter was impressed with Gadot’s performance as well as her ability to adapt the essence of a Wonder Woman who is intellectual, full of integrity and able to connect with others while still maintaining her strength and superhero power to fend off bad guys. “I really did believe in Wonder Woman,” Carter added. “I believed in the character. I believed [in her] every single moment I was on the screen.”

We had to ask if she still has the original costume.The answer is yes, but she can’t tell us where the two iconic ensembles are hidden (one is from the 1940s and the other from the ’70s). Fun Fact: Her tiny waist was all real, no costume cinching needed.

Though her Wonder Woman days are behind her, Carter still carries the character’s spirit with her.

“Wonder Woman exists in the hearts and minds of all of us, and that’s where people identify with my character and with Gal and Patty’s creation in this movie, “ she says “There’s some essence of the dignity and the beautiful nature of Wonder Woman that you walk out holding.”

This article appeared in the September 2017 issue of Washington Life magazine.

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