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Photo by Roshan Farazad.
Photo by Roshan Farazad.

Stars showed their support in light of Creative Coalition and Blue Star Families’ new PSA for suicide prevention. Plus, Roberta Myers on Washington style.
By Melissa Henderson

Elle Magazine Editor in chief Robbie Myers with guest. Photo by Roshan Farazad.

In a national effort to support our troops and their families, Creative Coalition teamed up with Blue Star Families and Elle Magazine for their new PSA to raise awareness and educate families, veterans and service members about suicide prevention. The event was held at the Ritz Carlton with former U.S intelligence officer, (not to mention on the  2011 Y&GL ) Lani Hay as host. In support of one of the most important health issues affecting our soldiers today, stars showed their support. Guests included Alyssa Milano,  Omar Epps, David Arquette, Ariel Winter, Jason Biggs and  Cheryl Hines, just to name few. Embracing Michelle Obama’s new campaign Joining Forces, this event comes just in time in celebration of the communities, non profits, small business, and families who are committed to working with the U.S. Armed Forces. WL caught up with the Editor in chief of Elle Magazine Roberta Myers, who, too, has two nephews in the military on active duty, to chat about Washington, women in business, and of course, fashion.  Relating everything back to fashion’s influence (but, why not?), we got Myers’ thoughts on what she advises Washington’s professional fashionistas to welcome, as well as thoughts on the new cool…

On Lani Hay

Washington Life: How did you connect with Former U.S. Intelligence Agent and Aviator Lani Hay?
Roberta Myers: I actually met Lani Hay during a Creative Coalition party when I was in town for the Inauguration. From the looks of her resume, I thought, gosh, she must be like 50 or 60 years old, but she is young [in her prime 30s] for all the amazing things she has done. I like women who want to do something and actually go out and do it!  She loves fashion; her style is a part of her whole aura. She’s got her eye on much bigger things. If you ask her, on the record, she is going to run for President in 2026.

On the State of Fashion

WL:  So, you have been editor in chief of Elle Magazine for nearly 12 years now, how have you seen the fashion industry change in regard to style and the modern American woman?
RM: Pop culture is created by the people who are living in the culture as it is happening, So, Shakespeare was pop culture when he was writing. For us, for Elle, we are where pop culture and fashion meet. We just released our Women in music issue. What’s that about?  It’s about being expressive about who you are. It is all commentary. I don’t want to over intellectualize fashion, but it means something. If you are working in Washington and have on a skirt below the knee and you are still wearing stockings, you transmit a lot of information about where you are and where you see yourself fitting. The last two years was about Michelle Obama. She showed up in young American designers. She showed her arms and legs.  That’s how modern women dress. She looks young, chic and cool.

On Washington Style

WL: Any immediate thoughts since your visit here?
RM: I appreciate that Washington seems to be less afraid of style and the idea that you can be an accomplished woman. I was brought up to , sort of, reject all that.  So, here I am the editor of a fashion magazine, but it’s a medium where we can put those things together. We talk to people who are highly accomplished (like Lani Hay with a diva fashion sense), and we look at the runway.  You can love fashion and  also want to save the world. Those things are no longer seen as inconsistent.

David Arquette shows his support for the cause. Photo by Roshan Farazad.

Cheryl Hines, star of Curb Your Enthusiasm. Photo by Roshan Farazad.

Alyssa Milano, expecting, attends the Creative Coalition event. Photo by Roshan Farazad

Host Lani Hay, far right, shows her support for troops. Photo by Roshan Farazad.

Alyssa Milano

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