People

Amanda Maddox

Articles

Chuck Close, Self-Portrait, 2000. 111-color silk screen, 65 ½ x 54 inches, edition of 80. Brand X Editions, printer (Robert Blanton, Thomas Little). Pace Editions, Inc., New York, publisher. Courtesy of the artist and Pace Editions, Inc.
Chuck Close, Self-Portrait, 2000. 111-color silk screen, 65 ½ x 54 inches, edition of 80. Brand X Editions, printer (Robert Blanton, Thomas Little). Pace Editions, Inc., New York, publisher. Courtesy of the artist and Pace Editions, Inc.

The Corcoran extends Chuck Close Prints: Process and Collaboration through Sep 26.

By Julie LaPorte

Chuck Close, Self-Portrait, 2000. 111-color silk screen, 65 ½ x 54 inches, edition of 80. Brand X Editions, printer (Robert Blanton, Thomas Little). Pace Editions, Inc., New York, publisher. Courtesy of the artist and Pace Editions, Inc.

Chuck Close, Self-Portrait, 2000. 111-color silk screen, 65 ½ x 54 inches, edition of 80. Brand X Editions, printer (Robert Blanton, Thomas Little). Pace Editions, Inc., New York, publisher. Courtesy of the artist and Pace Editions, Inc.

Filling five rooms with over 100 pieces of etchings, woodcuts, linoleum cuts, silk screens, lithographs and collages created from hand-made paper pulp, Chuck Close Prints: Process and Collaboration is on view at the Corcoran Gallery of Art and has been extended through

Chuck Close, Georgia, 1982. Pulp-paper collage on canvas, 48 x 38 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Chuck Close, Georgia, 1982. Pulp-paper collage on canvas, 48 x 38 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

September 26.

“One of the most influential artists of our time, Chuck Close has consistently advanced the art of printmaking. Through his collaborations with printers, and with his interest in methods and technologies, Close generates prints that acknowledge and utilize traditional processes but also propel them into a new era. The results are visually stunning,” said Amanda Maddox, assistant curator of photography and media arts, and organizing curator for the exhibition at the Corcoran.

This exhibition starts at the beginning of Close’s experiments with printmaking and follows his development as an artist and the techniques he has adopted through the years. It pulls back the curtain on Close’s creative process and allows viewers to see the dynamic methods involved in fashioning these large-scale, multi-layered pieces. The way the exhibit is displayed makes wonderful use of the space – each room seems larger and more spacious, as though they had to expand in order to hold these works. The art is grouped to show the original piece (a photograph, perhaps) and alongside, the vaious interpretations Close has rendered since.

Close’s creativity and innovation are easily seen in this exhibit, from the mezzotint Keith created in 1972 to the fingerprint Phil created in 1981 to the pulp-paper collage Georgia created in 1982 to the 113-color Japanese style ukiyo-e woodcut Emma created in 2002. Also on display were Self-portrait (anamorphic) created in 2007 and Roy Paper/Pulp created in 2009-2010. This final piece was accompanied by a time-lapsed video showing the amount of work and collaboration that went into its creation.

In conjunction with Chuck Close Prints: Process and Collaboration, there will be a lecture on September 9th at 6:30 pm given by American composer Philip Glass. Glass has been a friend and muse to Close, and he will be sharing his thoughts on the artist’s work and the collaborations they have worked on over the years.

This is a very exciting exhibit and one you won’t want to miss as we close out the summer. For more information and to plan your visit, please visit the Corcoran Gallery of Art.

Chuck Close, Phil/Fingerprint, 1981. Lithograph, 50 x 38 inches, edition of 36. Vermillion Editions, Minneapolis, printer (Steve Anderson). Pace Editions, Inc., New York, publisher. Courtesy of the artist.

Chuck Close, Phil/Fingerprint, 1981. Lithograph, 50 x 38 inches, edition of 36. Vermillion Editions, Minneapolis, printer (Steve Anderson). Pace Editions, Inc., New York, publisher. Courtesy of the artist.

Amanda Maddox

Articles