Open Plan

by Editorial
Gray pots coordinate with concrete pavers and weathered teak furniture on the rooftop terrace; the palms create a tropical feeling in the midst of Adams-Morgan.

Gray pots coordinate with concrete pavers and weathered teak furniture on the rooftop terrace; the palms create a tropical feeling in the midst of Adams-Morgan.

Having furnished the Adams Morgan loft by himself, the political consultant pooh-poohs the idea of hiring a professional designer. “It would be a waste of money. There’s no decorator that would know me better than me,” he quips.

An admirer of less-is-more architecture, Epstein eschews the traditional look of Queen Anne reproduction furniture and oriental rugs typical of Washington political types. “As you can see from the simple lines, I like the architecture of Mies van der Rohe,” he says, referring to the Bauhaus master. “I look for things that are modern and interesting.”

Some might interpret his preference for hip contemporary design as representative of a progressive Democrat, but Epstein brushes aside the suggestion. He says his taste is rooted in “things more emotional” than any political agenda. And though the lawyer-consultant insists he is “anti-label,” most of his furniture comes from Adlon, a Georgetown emporium that sells designer pieces from Italy, and Vega, a design store on 7th Street that closed in 2004.

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