Georgetown Safe House

by Editorial
The breakfast room designed by local architect Outerbridge Horsey in the 1990s features a cupola, wonderful light and two magnificent Piranesi prints.

The breakfast room designed by local architect Outerbridge Horsey in the 1990s features a cupola, wonderful light and two magnificent Piranesi prints.

His wife supervised preparation of the veal and dessert soufflé (information about the appetizer remains classified), assisted by her Filipina cook, Hermie, and two steadfast waiters, Steve and Greg: a trio that Irene Danilovich laughingly describes as a “behind-the-scenes operetta in the kitchen.”

The dining room looked then much as it does now, she says, gesturing past the 18th-century chinoiserie wall hanging to the handsome set of William IV chairs that surround a trestle table covered in white linen. Georgian silver, a Limoges dinner service and Peruvian silver water goblets, “mostly wedding gifts,” share bragging rights with a light-hearted floral delight — purplish alliums dramatically dotted amid daisies in square glass vases. A most inviting scene, indeed.

For larger affairs, the dining room’s 18-top seating capacity can be expanded to include another 12 in a small library which connects the living room to the master suite and another 12 in the striking breakfast room designed by local architect Outerbridge Horsey for the house’s second owner, George Herrick. Done in the style of the classic English architect Sir John Soane, it features a small cupola above 16 small windows which add immeasurably to the glorious garden light streaming in. On the far wall, ten-foot-tall Piranesi prints of the colossal Trajan and Antonine triumphal relief columns in Rome flank four curiously small Egyptian-motif pillars (that turn out to be old balustrade posts) perched over a doorway to a connecting study.

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