Fashionable Life: Red Carpet Style Tips

The Oscars are the most glamorous night in America and Paul Wharton has all the trends to look for as well as ideas for the next time you are on the red carpet.

Style guru Paul Wharton. (Photo by Tamu McPherson)

Style guru Paul Wharton is ready for Oscars. Are you? This annual film award ceremony has turned into a fashion extravaganza. What will the celebs be facing when they make their choice to wear or not wear, look or not look a certain way? Wharton breaks it down for us:

THE BASICS

Dressing well and looking good on the red carpet is all about fit. Movie stars look flawless because their clothes fit perfectly. They have a team of stylists to make sure the clothes not only fit and flatter their bodies, but hide any flaws and imperfections. Even if you don’t have a stylist, a talented tailor can help you achieve that perfect fit. The most flattering red carpet looks should skim over your body, showing the outline of your figure, not hug too tightly, hang or bag too loosely.

If you see a fabulous actress on the Oscar red carpet this Sunday and you want to achieve her look, be mindful of her coloring, body shape and the overall style that is being conveyed. If the actress is a size 0 with olive skin and a short black cropped do and you are a size 8 with fair skin and long blonde hair, the look may not work on you. Only wear what’s right for your body type and lifestyle.

Red carpet fads are over in a flash of a strobe light – trends last a little longer, but you still don’t want to invest too heavily in them. Use them to influence your wardrobe choices but in the end, stick with timeless classics that you can accessorize and make your own.

JEWELRY

Jewelry, worn correctly can frame and accentuate your features. Take into consideration the size of your features, body type and bone structure. These elements will determine the size of the jewelry pieces that will look best on you. Earrings can brighten up your face and add sparkle to your eyes, making your face and neck look slimmer. Experiment with different sizes of jewelry until you find the sizes that are the most flattering. If you’re wearing one bold piece of jewelry, your dress can’t have big, bold prints. Instead, opt for solid colors, you will look much more chic.

Wearing more than one show-stopping piece of jewelry on the red carpet at one time will usually not work. Stick to one unique or classic piece that makes a fashion statement. Try an embellished cuff or an elaborate necklace and if it looks great, finish there.

MAKE-UP

Make your eyes pop on the red carpet by using your palest eye shadow shade as a base, to neutralize the lid color and prime the eyes for a long-lasting crease-proof color. Use eye shadow to line, define, highlight and contour the eye.

To prevent your eye shadow from creasing, prime your eyelid with your concealer or foundation on your lids. Apply eye shadow and dust with a translucent powder. You can also use your eye shadow to line your eyes. It gives a softer, more natural looking effect than pencil or liner. Use a thin, angled brush, pick up some of your shadow on it and dot it across the top of your lash line. Natural nude is an interesting and attractive way to wear eye shadow. Browns are subtle and look good on all complexions.

HAIR

I’m looking forward to seeing flowing waves and chic side swept chignons on the 2012 Oscars red carpet. If you’re doing your own hair for your red carpet look, go easy with the hair products. Less is more. Overuse of styling products will just weigh your hair down. Limp, greasy, heavy and difficult hair is usually the result of too much product. Less is always better.

Check out Paul Wharton as the fashion contributor on ABC 7’s primetime Oscars Red Carpet Special tonight at 8pm on ABC 7.

You can also see Paul on the new show Paul Wharton Style debuting on DC 50 in March 2012.

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