Features: A Climate in Crisis

100 billion tons of carbon were added to the atmosphere since 2000 with no signs of slowing this pace.

By Laura Wainman 

The Jet Star Roller Coaster was found in the ocean after part of New Jersey's Funtown Pier was destroyed during Superstorm Sandy (AP Photo/ Mel Evans, File)

The Jet Star Roller Coaster was found in the ocean after part of New Jersey’s Funtown Pier was destroyed during Superstorm Sandy (AP Photo/ Mel Evans, File)

As we went to print with our April issue in late March, there was snow on the ground, while our West Coast friends were in the middle of a three-year drought. Certainly no one can now deny that we are facing a climate crisis with carbon dioxide levels and greenhouse gas emissions at their highest levels in history. Entire portions of Greenland have been found to be melting, and if that ice sheet was to completely melt, 23 feet of sea level would be pushed into the oceans leaving many of the world’s population centers near sea level uninhabitable.

Read on by double clicking our April cover image below to see the full story from the April 2014 issue and see the chart below to discover how scientists propose we balance mitigating future damage with the need to adapt to current circumstances. 

Screen shot 2014-04-17 at 2.44.26 PM

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