Two Jewelry Families Converge Their Legacies

opens its first East Coast boutique at Tiny Jewel Box in Dupont Circle. 

MacKenzie and Jeff Hogg. Photo by .

The new Harry Kotlar boutique at Tiny Jewel Box takes visitors through the storied jeweler’s legacy, from Kotlar’s dedication and commitment to fine jewelry (they recruit craftsman from Italy to hand-fabricate every piece) to the A-listers who have worn the brand’s baubles, including former first lady , singer Katy Perry and actress Sofia Vergara.

arrives to her performance at Disneyland in jewelry by Harry Kotlar. Photo credit: Snorlax / MEGA Agency

. Photo by Ben Droz.

A special anniversary display at the boutique launch featured seven notable pieces, each representing the decade in which it was crafted. Other high carat items on display included Harry Kotlar’s rare Type IIA, Internally Flawless Emerald Cut diamond priced at $800,000.

The history of the Kotlar family’s success as leaders in the jewelry industry runs deep. After escaping Poland during World War II, Harry Kotlar worked hard to build his eponymous label in the U.S., through exemplary service and superior craftsmanship. Such high standards attracted the Rosenheim family, owners of Washington landmark Tiny Jewel Box, to team up with Kotlar just in time for its 70th anniversary.

Jim and Matthew Rosenheim. Photo by Ben Droz.

For the Los Angeles-based brand – which is a favorite among celebrities – opening a flagship boutique on the East Coast was a considered move. “We’ve been very careful to choose quality over quantity,” , Harry Kotlar President and Head Designer explained. “We work with only the best artisans and diamonds and partner with only the very best in the jewelry world.”

and David Wiener. Photo by Ben Droz.

At the launch party, Tiny Jewel Box president Matthew Rosenheim expressed a similar sentiment about the partnership, citing both TJB and Kotlar’s extensive in-house capabilities as being “hard to replicate.” He also spoke of the brand’s unique and extraordinary approach to production. “There’s no casting in any of their jewelry – everything is entirely forged by hand out of metal,” Rosenheim said. “It is virtually impossible to find talent that can do this kind of work today.”

This article appeared in the Holiday 2018 issue of Washington Life magazine. 

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